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RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself

 
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RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/12/2011 4:08:33 AM   
Scottish Anna


Posts: 1122
Joined: 2/2/2011
From: Leicester, England
Status: offline
Drool, drool, drool, Janome 12000, drool again.

Oh you lucky woman, I'm jealous, but I will have to stay with my trusty 300e, lol.

Welcome Chris, this is a wonderful forum.  I wish you many happy hours of sewing, enjoy your new baby and tell us all about it!

Hugs

Anna


_____________________________

I would be unstoppable, if I could just get started!

I want to do, not think, that is my problem!

(in reply to chriscraft)
Post #: 41
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/12/2011 8:32:38 AM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
Status: offline
Shirley will enjoy hearing someone has gotten the Janome 12000. I believe that is high on her will list.

Let's keep this going. If you are reading this and have not contributed it is your turn. It doesn't mean you have been sewing for years or that you even do machine embroidery. Maybe you just like seeing the pretty pics of the lovely projects. Or maybe your a sewer wantabe. I love the stories.

_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to Scottish Anna)
Post #: 42
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/12/2011 10:26:08 AM   
tizmehr

 

Posts: 389
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Ontario, Canada
Status: offline
My mother was a beautiful seamstress.  I've always striven to sew as well as she did. 
Mum taught three of her kids to sew but I was the only one who stuck with it.  I made my first piece of clothing, other than doll clothes, when I was 11 and oh how pleased I was with myself.  That dress was done in a paisley print and to this day I just love paisley.
When I got to high school and Home Ec was offered, I signed up immediately.  I got to spend time at school doing exactly what I loved doing and I figured it would be an easy A for me.  My sister got married while I was taking that Home Ec class and I was making my bridesmaid's dress for her wedding.  We had very little notice for her wedding so I had a grand total of 2 weeks to get my dress done.  I was using a Swiss dot fabric that had to be lined and both dress and lining were multiple tiers of gathered fabric and lace trim. (When I read that now, it sounds really ugly, but heck, it was the early '70s.) Thankfully, the sewing teacher agreed that I could work on it in class instead of the pull on A-line jumper that was the class project.  I got my dress done plus the jumper and I got my A.
When I started my first job I was still living at home so I was able to save my entire first two pay cheques to buy myself a sewing machine.  My mother and I shopped and shopped for that machine until I finally decided on a Kenmore. I remember a big selling point was that it actually did zig zag, a stretch stitch and had a buttonhole attachment!  I did an awful lot of sewing on that machine.  Work clothes, my wedding dress, tons and tons of clothes for my three daughters and yards and yards of drapes.  That Kenmore was an incredible workhorse.  About ten years ago, I finally admitted that I needed to replace it and bought another Kenmore.  I hung on to my original machine and although it no longer likes to stitch on fine fabrics and the buttonholer won't work properly, it's great for working with heavy canvas or denim with a straight stitch.
When I bought that second machine I noticed the embroidery machines.  I remember talking to a sewing friend and saying that I just couldn't see the need for one of those.  Of course, a year or so later I was trying to find something sewing related on the internet and started reading about machine embroidery.  I caught the bug and started looking at the machines with longing.  I did a lot of research and realized that I absolutely wanted a stand alone embroidery machine.  My husband,who is very computer savvy, was the one who said he liked the Janome 300E Flashcard method of design transfer. At that point I knew next to nothing about computers and didn't even know what questions to ask on that side of things.  Luckily, through my research I came across the Martha Pullen Phorums and that's how I learned about Embird before I bought.  I started out with Embird and that's all I ever use. 
I heard about an Embird seminar being held where I could easily get to.  I emailed and asked if Font Engine parameters would be covered.  I was told it wasn't going to be covered specifically, but if I took the digitizing portion of the seminar it would teach me what I wanted to know about Font Engine.  When it comes to drawing, I am stick man challenged and I knew I'd never digitize anything but if it would help me understand Font Engine ....  Well, a year later and I love that I can digitize!  I find all kinds of artwork that I can bring up as an image and work over top of and I get such a thrill stitching out things just exactly the way I want them.
I'm so glad that I found this forum and all the wonderful people on here.  You've all led me to adventures that I never thought possible. 





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Sam

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 43
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/12/2011 10:58:46 AM   
suzanne52

 

Posts: 43
Joined: 2/16/2011
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My mother was also a wonderful seamstress as was my grandmother. So I would sew during the summer when I was a teenager! I got married a month after I graduated high school and my parents bought me a sewing machine. I sewed on that one until years later, I bought another Kenmore and my next upgrade was a Pfaff 1471. I learned so much by watching Sewing with Nancy and then Marhta Pullen on TV. I knew I wanted an embroidery machine. I finally purchased a Babylock Esante in 2000. I love my machine. I know it is getting old, but it still works like new! I still use the Pfaff 1471 also. My mother broke her leg twice in 2010 and then she passed away in Jan. of this year. I just didn't have the time in 2010 to do much sewing and then this year, my heart was just not in it. We both shared such a love for sewing and creating. The day before she passed away in her sleep, she was at her machine trying to put a doll together. Every time I would try to sit down and sew, I was just overwhelmed with missing her that I had to get up. But I am starting to feel the "itch" to get back to sewing, I could forget the world when I was at my machines. This forum has taught me so much about heirloom sewing and just reading about your passion, the same passion that I have, is wonderful. I really don't have anyone to talk to me about sewing anymore. My mom and I could talk for hours about sewing or creating something and I miss that!! Let me thank you again.

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Sue in LA

(in reply to tizmehr)
Post #: 44
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/12/2011 12:03:45 PM   
Sparkle

 

Posts: 1256
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: South Carolina
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O, Suzanne!  When my Grama died I felt the same way!!!  I didn't sew again until a year later when I was pregnant with my first and had to sew baby 'kimonoes' we called them.  I'd sit at that sewing machine and the tears woudl just pour down my face!  I could just feel her standing and watching me over my shoulder.

_____________________________

Barbara O.
Fine Stitchery
http://finestitchery.com/

(in reply to suzanne52)
Post #: 45
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 10:39:52 AM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
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Sue, I know how you feel. My Dad was my cheerleader when it came to sewing. He bought me a machine when I was 15. Mom didn't think I needed one. He would take me to the fabric stores and drop me off to pick our my fabric and patterns. We had a sales room in the village, the ladies who worked there knew to let me have anything I wanted and he would pay for it. His mother and aunts were all excellent seamstresses. He was proud of everything I did. He died when I was 23. It was so hard to start sewing again. One day I was sitting with my coffee thinking what was I to wear to a formal Navy party. The fabric and pattern was already bought sitting on the sewing machine. I sware I heard my Daddy's voice tell me "off and on. Get to it." Off my butt and on my feet. After that I felt disrespectful not useing my talent God gave me and Daddy encouraged.

Come on people there are alot of stories we need to hear.

_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to Sparkle)
Post #: 46
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 12:08:08 PM   
JBSEWSINWV

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 2/2/2011
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Hi, I've been reading with interest everyone's story. I've only posted once on the old forum, so I should be considered a newbie. I've been sewing for 40 plus years. I'm a Bernina owner, 131, 730, Deco ME and a 1300 serger. Love to heirloom sew, quilt and learning to smock. Enjoy reading this forum.

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 47
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 12:19:24 PM   
ShirleyCalgary


Posts: 11516
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Calgary Area of Alberta
Status: online
Well welcome to the forum.  Learning new things is good for the brain.  Wish that I had someone nearby who liked heirloom or smocking but this is quilt country.

_____________________________

Shirley - Mom to Dickens (PuppyWuppy now known as Dicky Wicky)and Doyle (baby) and Baxter, Bella, Pistol, Cowboy, ChiChi at Rainbow Bridge
I sew on Janome 8000, 10001, 11000se, 12000, 350e, 300e, Janome 234d and Babylock Imagine

(in reply to JBSEWSINWV)
Post #: 48
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 1:00:24 PM   
EmilyB

 

Posts: 222
Joined: 2/1/2011
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As long as I can remember, I have had a love for needle arts and handcrafts. At the age of eight, I completed my first hand sewing project in an elementary school sewing class. Although my mother had a sewing machine, she did not do much sewing and referred my questions to my aunt and grandmother who were both experienced seamstresses. I took sewing classes with 4-H groups, Girl Scouts and Home Economic classes in school and made many of my own clothes by junior high. I still remember the pink grain sack dress made of 2 bags, same design, but obviously different dye lots.

After a hiatus from sewing while I attended Nursing School, I purchased my first sewing machine and took sewing and tailoring classes at our local Continuing Education courses before the birth of our first son. Again, I made many of my clothes, clothes for my two sons as well as sewing for friends and family.

Our town housed the County Home Improvement and Creative Arts Center which gave me an opportunity to take many classes to hone skills in a myriad of areas that I had already dabbled in including knitting, crocheting, weaving, embroidery, quilting, macramé and chair caning.

Fast forward to my purchase of a computerized embroidery machine and a revival of my sewing in the late 90’s. Because of my unending love of taking classes, I signed up for a class in heirloom sewing, totally unaware of what it was other than “sewing” and another phase of my sewing career took off. It was a traveling MP school and my first exposure to heirloom sewing. After machine embroidering on everything that could possibly be embroidered, and making several quilts, I reverted back to heirloom sewing and have taken classes with many of the finest teachers in the world. My husband Donald and I have two sons and five grandchildren and have traveled to all continents of the world pursuing his love of nature photography. After many years of traveling to remote parts of the world in less than ideal conditions, I am very happy to now attend sewing events and try to do this several times a year. Like many others, my list of machines has grown and I truly do feel like they are like my children and have only traded in one. A few days later I called my dealer to see if I could buy it back, but it had already been sold to my dismay.

This has been an interesting thread, let's keep it going.

Del

(in reply to ShirleyCalgary)
Post #: 49
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 2:07:11 PM   
Linda S.

 

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Joined: 2/2/2011
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All of these stories are so interesting! I don't know what's worth telling about myself, but here goes.

My mother taught herself to sew, and sewed for my brothers and sisters and I when we were young, because often we couldn't afford to buy 'ready made'. And it wasn't until I was older and tried sewing clothes myself that I realized how much love, time and work went into each garment she made, every one sewn to our specific size and with definite ideas about what we wanted. Back then, I thought nothing of asking Mom to make a couple of bathing suits for me! Where she found time to sew for 4 children, in addition to working outside the home, cooking and cleaning I'll never be able to figure out. Occasionally, Mom would sew something for herself but only if everyone else had not only what they needed, but what they wanted. My mother was a true Christian saint of a woman.

My grandmother sewed too, and brought back the most amazing fabrics from far away places like Paris and Germany. I remember one shift dress (shifts were all the rage back then ; ) she made for me out of silk she picked up in Paris which had little Eiffel Towers and parisian scenes printed all over. Grandma also liked to embroider, and I must have been around 6 when I first picked up an embroidery needle. We did crewel work together, needlepoint and other embroidery and she was always so proud of every little thing I did. The actual sewing would come much later for me.

I remember my mother asking me if I'd like to learn to sew, and my answer to her was, "Why should I learn how to sew when I have you?". The irony of this statement would become obvious and back to haunt me later. But, back to my sewing history.

When I was in highschool, I wore hippie clothes (back in the 70's) and tried my hand at making purses. This was the first thing I can remember actually sewing. My dear mother made for me the cutest little smock tops that were so popular then, and I sat watching her sew them for me and for my friend, again thinking nothing of asking her to "stitch up a few"! I'm so glad I did get to tell her before she passed away how selfish I was back then, not realizing how much work and time went into making such a garment. This revelation dawned on me while trying to make a tube top for myself, out of knit.

Tube tops were very popular in the 70's and 80's, and I looked at one thinking to myself, "surely anyone can make a tube top". So I bought the terry knit fabric, and set about making my tube. The stretchy thing turned out to be several sizes too big, would have fit my horse and no matter how I cut the fabric. I tried and tried, and never could get it to look right. With this failure, I abandoned sewing with the rationalization that if someone couldn't even make a tube top, they certainly shouldn't be sewing! Little did I know I could have used a serger for this, or that there were other, better stretch stitches I could have used for success. But in any case, I swore off sewing for years.

And then my little girl came along. At the time I had accidently strolled into a small heirloom sewing shop in the little town we lived in, where I saw the most beautiful baby clothes I had ever seen. This was the first time I had ever seen fine swiss batiste fabric. The smocking and embroidery took my breath away, and with much encouragement from the nice lady who owned the shop, I signed up for a smocking class. To my utter amazement, I was able to do the smocking for a dress yoke and bonnet. (for this pattern I had purchased a little book in the shop called, 'French Handsewing by Machine', by Martha Pullen ; ) But the day finally came when I had to actually USE these smocked pieces by putting it in a garment. I was utterly mortified at the prospect....sheer terror stuck my heart with the thought of it, but again with much encouragement from the shop owner (God bless your dear heart Linda, wherever you are!) I forged on. Motivated mainly by wanting my little girl to wear fine clothes like these, I gave it a try. And so when I completed a little yoke dress and matching bonnet, no one was more surprised than me! I did it!

One day I was browsing around a high-end baby boutique, and was awestruck by the most beautiful little white batiste bib I had ever seen, embellished with shadow embroidery. I think they were asking something like $40 for this little bib, and I thought to myself SURELY I can make this! And to my delight I made a baby bib, complete with shadow embroidery. I think I can credit this little bib (simple as it is) for all the encouragement I needed to try yet more sewing. And as they say, 'the rest is history' ; )

My sewing horizons expanded when my daughter was about 7, and a woman at our church noticed the pretty little clothes my daughter wore. She recognized these as heirloom sewing and praised my sewing : ) She was a sewer too, and had a business making custom drapery and occasionally sewed clothes for special occasions (mostly bridal). She asked me if I would work for her (she had other women doing the easy stuff), and this I did for several years. Forced to complete things I had been given (and on time!), I gained much confidence this way. I am very grateful to this woman for everything she taught me, and for thinking I could learn to do sewing as she did. I learned alot working for this wonderfully talented woman (who did everything the old fashioned, as she said the "right" way ; ), and later did sewing out of my home. This was how I made a little extra money, and could still be a stay home mom. I sewed for local decorators, all of the costumes for school plays and anything else needed by church or school. And for my daughter, of course.

And then we decided to move to a farm, where my then very tomboy daughter could have horses (as I did when I was a tomboy girl ; ). All of the work needed to bring this fixer-upper up farm to par took all of our spare time for a few years, and my sewing then switched to things like horse blankets and the like. These sewing machines of mine (always gifts from my dear sweet husband) have certainly served me well throughout the years! I often wonder how anyone can manage without a sewing machine in their home!

My first sewing machine was my mother's old Kenmore, and in 1986 an Elnita. And then my husband bought me a Babylock serger. I was so intimidated by this machine, I tried to sell it right away! Well, thankfully it didn't sell and I was forced to learn to use it. Now I CAN make tube tops! LOL! (of course I wouldn't wear "tube tops" anymore ; ) Several years later, my husband gave me a Janome 8000 for Christmas, and I was absolutely floored at recieving this gift! This machine utterly amazed me. And this sweet husband of mine knows terms like, "differential feed" and "heirloom pinstitching"....so I now have a Babylock Ellure with more heirloom stitches and a Necci serger with differential feed : )...both gifts from my husband who thinks I'm an amazing sewer. Bless his dear heart. He also knows the names of famous sewers like Martha Pullen, Mizlilly, Vada, Anna, Sparkle, and many others who are here on this forum.

Now I sew things for my home (horses are a thing of the past now while my poor husband just does alot of mowing!), but I most love sewing for babies, my first love. Through this group, I've gained much needed inspiration and know-how and my heirloom sewing has taken on a whole new scope! I'm ever amazed at the answer to questions I never even thought to ask! No matter what the question or problem someone is experiencing with their sewing, there is always someone here (usually several people!) who have the answer or solution. And I must say that I've met THE most wonderful Christian women here. Of any forum I've ever been associated with, this one is by far the most wonderful because of the kind hearted and extremely talented women who are here. I'm so very glad I checked it out!

And by the way, my daughter now maintains, "Why should I learn how to sew, when I have you?!" Payback? LOL!




(in reply to JBSEWSINWV)
Post #: 50
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 2:27:19 PM   
Linda S.

 

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P.S. I am embarassed when I see how long this turned out! Sorry for that. I was just talking and dreaming away, walking down memory lane...quite a ways, as it turns out!

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 51
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 3:40:04 PM   
SewingGrammie

 

Posts: 230
Joined: 4/13/2011
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Wow what inspirational stories. I am still fairly new to this site, but I am enjoying it a lot. I havent been able to do a large amount of heirloom sewing yet, but I want to. I come from generations of sewers, at least as far back as a couple of my great grandmothers. I have a camisol that my great grandmother made for my grandmother for her wedding day to wear under her wedding gown. the yoke is crocheted the rest is made of cotton. I have a quilt that another great grandmother pieced with the help of my mother when my mother was a little girl. She remembers her grandmother talking about all the memories in the fabrics she chose and my mother passed those memories down to me. My grandmother (Mom's mom) actually quilted that quilt so its a 3 generation quilt I am passing down to one of my daughters who loves it and the memories.

I actually started sewing at the age of 8. I was a Brownie Girl Scout and we made aprons by sewing a piece of bias tape to the top of a dish towel. My mother had a machine, an old Singer touch and sew that she made things on, but she never learned to use patterns and she encouraged me to take Home Ec in high school and learn as much as I could. My grandmother made all kinds of things including cheerleader outfits for the local cheerlearders, but she never taught my mother to use the patterns. Mom learned to make full circle skirts and bags and things without a pattern, but she mostly mended our clothes for us.

At age 9 Mom started a 4H club for me and my friends. She taught us to embroider by hand and I still have the dish towel that I made. She was so encouraging to me and said that even though I was one of the younger girls in the group I was one of the better sewers.

In High School I had to really good teachers who let me go beyond the scope of the class and make some more advanced clothing. I made blouses and a one piece pants outfit that was really in at the time. I wasn't very good at choosing the right fabric to go with the pattern, but once I got started sewing I did well.

Years later when I got married my mom gave me her sewing machine. It had been a top of the line computerized Singer when my Dad bought it for her, but by the time I got married it was already 10 years old and had some problems. The repairman told me that they didn't make Singers like they used to and that after that time there were things that would not be able to be fixed or replaced. I used that machine for another 15 years or so. Then my Dear husband bought me a new one. I had no idea what to get, but by that time we had 4 children, 3 of them girls and I sewed all the time. I made most of my girls clothing and a lot of my own and my sons. So I ended up with a Brother PC5000. Which I still use today.

The heirloom sewing idea came to me when my husband was in the Marine Corps and stationed in Beaufort, SC. There was a little sewing shop down town that had classes and sold smocking supplies and heirloom patterns, etc. I was so inspired. I would go in there and drool and get ideas, but I didn't have the money to buy most of the stuff. I did buy the book "Heirloom Sewing by Machine" and I tried out some of the techniques on my little girls clothes. I usually couldn't buy the nice fabrics and just used calico or gingham, but I had fun experimenting.

I think I learned more over the years just by playing around. I just finished my 2nd daughters wedding gown, which her and I designed together. I made the bridesmaids dresses for the first daughters wedding, now the gown and bridesmaid dresses for the 2nd one. I still have the flower girl dress left to do, which I am excited about. I made an heirloom dress last spring for my granddaughter and she loves me to sew for her. She calls me "Grammie" and comes over and says, "Make something for me Grammie!" She is already a crafter at age 2 1/2 she goes to the craft store and says, "I need a craft project!"

I hope to get an embroidery machine in the future, and maybe one that does quilting as well. Sewing is my way of expressing myself and I would love to learn more. I collect sewing books and devour them. I went to the sewing and quilt expo last year in our city and got so inspired. Wish I could go again this year and actually take some classes, but I don't think it will happen, the wedding is too close. Maybe next year.

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 52
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 6:42:04 PM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
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Linda don't apologize for the length. I loved reading every word on this thread. It is so much fun!!! I expect a lot more when I come back after the weekend.

_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to SewingGrammie)
Post #: 53
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 7:25:52 PM   
DonnaSewsAgain

 

Posts: 473
Joined: 3/16/2011
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I'm so enjoying your stories! I read each and every one. I was just thinking tonight after reading some more how for most of us, sewing is just another name for love!

Donna

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 54
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/13/2011 8:00:40 PM   
slowstitcher

 

Posts: 644
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: New Orleans
Status: offline
Linda S...this is quite interesting. I have been looking for tube tops for a few yrs now. To wear when working in the garden. The summers here are so hot and humid. They shouldn't cost much to buy. Just need to find them. Getting into fall and winter...they won't be around until next yr.
quote:

hought about trying to make them but never did. Don't have a serger. Did you make any? Can you offer tips?

(in reply to DonnaSewsAgain)
Post #: 55
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/15/2011 1:01:34 AM   
Roxann

 

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Joined: 2/1/2011
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I don't even remember not sewing or knitting or embroidering or "making things" of some sort since childhood...probably started by weaving those loopy things on a little frame and making potholders out of them!! I did 4-H sewing for many years and my dear dad facilitated getting the sewing machine of my dreams when I was about 12-14...I told him I would do ALL his mending! Silly me...he was a farmer, hard on his clothes, and of course my sweet mom thought it was a fine deal...she hated mending! This machine was one that my aunt owned...a Singer 503 (Rocketeer) which had cams to make fancy stitches. At that time, the Singer man made housecalls out in the country, and sold my aunt a newer version, then came to our house and sold her wonderful machine to my dad for me! I sewed everything on that machine and did a bit of mending too.
In HS, I wouldn't have considered taking Home Ec as I figured I knew as much about cooking and sewing as anyone....When the counselor in my senior year heard that I intended to major in Home Economics at the University (wanting to be an extension service agent), he insisted that I enroll in that class! Ugh...it was a disaster of a class for me, l probably knew more than the teacher!
Well, upon graduating, my dad and mom gifted me with a new sewing machine to take to college with me...I used it often and did lots of little hemming and repairs for my friends. I worked in a fabric shop while in college...it specialized in knits (polyester! and others) and taught Stretch and Sew classes. I didn't much care for the faculty in the Home Ec dept, so decided to change my major to science...more men in my classes too! Found a good one for my 21st birthday, eventually married him, and this year we celebrated our 35th anniversary.
Meanwhile...my mom had decided to get a new sewing machine and trade in the Rocketeer....I begged her to trade in my machine and give me that one, and she did. That sweet machine moved everywhere with me and sewed so many of my clothes, shirts and even a suit for dh, as well as baby and kid clothes for my sons. Finally in the mid 90's, it was on it's" last legs", and my mom who was a wise woman... insisted that I get a new machine...a Bernina 1130...Oh, I was in love all over again. The dear ol' Rocketeer went to live with my sis-in-law...who incidently lived in the same house as my aunt who had first owned the machine. Then, with the 1130, I discovered heirloom sewing, and did a bit of it...loved it, but no real need for it with my lifestyle...I took some porcelain doll making classes and dressed a few in heirloom dresses...no little girls to sew for. Tried smocking, but didn't really click.
When I joined MP forum...many years ago, I caught the fever for machine embroidery, and eventually bought a Bernina 180...I owe it all to v, Neonparrot, Dutch, Maltesers, SewLo, and the other early members who were having too much fun embroidering. I still favor the 180 for embroidery and now have a Pfaff CV also to use for bigger projects. I worked for years in the lab at a couple of different oncology offices, and met so many wonderful and talented people. One dear lady brought in a fabulous quilt she'd made for her brother...each square depicted a time or event of his life. When she said she no longer sewed, I asked her why. To my surprise, she said she just couldn't afford a new machine when hers broke. Her advice to me...get all the tools and toys you'll need before you retire...
As for MP forum...what a terrific history of kind and generous ladies. Remember making quilts for Molly, Princess Blue Eyes, and Elizabeth Smart and her sister...and the flood of pillowcases we sent to Barb for forwarding to the soldiers in Iraq? I've had the great pleasure of meeting quite a number of our remarkable members...mostly at the Puyallup SewExpo. Mizlilly, Chere, Shebru, SusanB, MaryBi, Maltesers, and also Martha Pullen and many of her staff.
I started piecing quilts a dozen or so years ago and still enjoy it very much. I rarely keep any of them, they are usually gifted to a local group who provides comfort quilts for children. I especially enjoy combining ME and quilting in a project. I do enjoy my local quilt guild and the inspiration it provides. My newest challenge is improving my free motion quilting abilities. It is very rare that a day goes by without at least a few minutes at the machine. I am at home now, left work about 3 years ago to become the caregiver for my special needs son, so I have more time to be creative
About 2 years ago, my dsil moved, and asked if I'd like the old Rocketeer back since it wasn't working any longer...of course, I jumped at the chance to have one more dance with her...a serious cleanup, lubrication, oiling, and some adjusting, and she still sews, even if she is a bit worse for the wear and tear. That machine was worth every cent that my dad paid...sewed miles and miles over lots of years, and oh....the memories that machine and I stitched together!

< Message edited by Roxann -- 10/15/2011 3:08:34 AM >


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Roxann

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Post #: 56
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/15/2011 9:00:16 AM   
MLA


Posts: 570
Joined: 2/3/2011
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Thanks Roxann I love your work and your story. I knew you had to be a long time sewer with the beautiful work that you do. I remember the Smart quilts and I wonder if it ment as much to her and her sister as it did us that worked on it.
I love the stories and all the things that everyone does but I thought everyone had a long back ground with all the beautiful things they put out and share with others. Keep the stories coming.

(in reply to Roxann)
Post #: 57
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/16/2011 11:44:14 AM   
Linda S.

 

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Joined: 2/2/2011
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Slowstitcher,

I don't know what I can offer in the way of a tip for making a tube top. The kind I attempted to make was made out of terry knit fabric, which is why as a non-sewer I had to much trouble with it. This fabric is very stretchy, and so when I tried straight stitching on it...it would just flee in front of my presser foot LOL! I'm sure you wouldn't make this same mistake, but a serger seam is the only one I would use for such a stretchy fabric. (I had never heard of a serger back then ; )

If I were going to make a tube top today, I would first cut the fabric using a stretchy serger seam and letting the blade cut away the fabric (rather than cutting the tube fabric with scizzors). Then I would sew the rectangle of fabric to form a "tube", using a serged seam. I would turn the top under to form a casing for elastic, and serge that seam too. I would hem the bottom by serging a hem seam.

I have never made a tube top! Maybe in part because the first attempt was such a dismal failure! Wish I could be more help, maybe someone else here will have better tips! A tube top would be nice to wear out gardening in hot weather.

I've been wanting to make a cotton woven top similar to this for days when it's hot and I'm working in my garden. Cotton woven fabric is very comfortable for hot weather. If I ever get around to it, I will cut a rectangle that is a little bigger than the circumferance of my underarm measurement, seam the one back seam, and then turn under a casing at the top for elastic while leaving a little place to thread elastic through later.. All that's left to do then is to hem the bottom (however long you want that to be) and thread some elastic through the casing. One could also sew a couple of buttom holes in the center front casing, and thread a draw string through (instead of elastic).

(in reply to MLA)
Post #: 58
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/16/2011 3:00:26 PM   
shebru


Posts: 2069
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Sunny Gloroius Central Oregon
Status: offline
Linda, wasn't that stretchy terry knit fabric called velor?  I fantasized that I was going to make a bathing suit out of it!  On my mom's old singer.... beautiful hot pink and lavendar.....  I love the fabric but run for the woods to this day when I see it!!!!!!!!  I have never had something so alive and uncooperative in all of my life that I recall and be called fabric!

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 59
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/16/2011 5:47:37 PM   
mizlilly


Posts: 3827
Joined: 2/1/2011
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I think there is a fabric called French terry, which is a stretchy, looped terry, and then there is velour, which is cut, like a plush towel. With the personality of a boa constrictor... yep, I hate sewing on it too! I was making an outfit for Jameson when he was about a year old... beautiful green velour... about drove me crazy! And the pattern called for velour and regular lining. That is an exercise in absolute frustration. I sort of tamed it finally with Perfect Sew. And I ditched the lining! The evil twin of velour has got to be silk batiste. That stuff turns into liquid when you touch it!

And just a little reminder for those of you who have written more than a few words... I don't think Margaret Mitchell ever apologized because Gone With The Wind was too long, nor Tolstoy for his weighty tome, War and Peace. Write on girls!

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(in reply to shebru)
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