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RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself

 
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RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/16/2011 6:57:49 PM   
ShirleyCalgary


Posts: 11557
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Calgary Area of Alberta
Status: offline
Slow stitcher - why not buy some eyelet - use the preembroidered hem as your top - I would guess that you would need the full 45 inches for front and also for back - line it up and seam one side on the serger - you will have to decide how long you want it.  Load some bobbins with elastic thread - get a quilting ruler - the long kind and dry lines across the fabric about 3/4 apart - I think that you will need about 4 bobbins - I wound them while stretching the elastic on my bobbin winder  leave long ends at every row and sew along the lines.  I made a dress using this technique for my grand daughter.   Before you start if you have decided how long you want the tube top to be you can go ahead and hem the bottom as it will be easier than after you have all those rows of elastic going on.  Audition the fabric on the front of you as you will be wearing it once completed.


_____________________________

Shirley - Mom to Dickens (PuppyWuppy now known as Dicky Wicky)and Doyle (baby) and Baxter, Bella, Pistol, Cowboy, ChiChi at Rainbow Bridge
I sew on Janome 8000, 10001, 11000se, 12000, 350e, 300e, Janome 234d and Babylock Imagine

(in reply to mizlilly)
Post #: 61
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/16/2011 11:54:05 PM   
KCline

 

Posts: 90
Joined: 2/1/2011
Status: offline
Hello my friends! 

I started hand embroidery on pillowcases when I was about 8 years old.  A neighbor in the summer would invite me to her house during tea time and teach me.  While my grandmother crocheted and knitted beautifully she did not read English and just looked at the books to create her designs.  Her 8 children and all of her grandchildren only wore hand knitted socks (do you believe that?). So I always watched her but she didn't think she could teach me.  Eventually when I was about 15, I worked in a skilled nursing facility and bought my first sewing machine...a Kenmore and started teaching myself how to sew.  When I was 17 I bought a crochet and knitting book and taught myself first how to knit.  I will never forget the first blue blanket I knitted.  When I lost a stitch in a row, I'd rip the hole thing and start all over again because I didn't know how to pick up the stitch and fix it.  One day I figured that there must be a better way to do this that certainly over the years women didn't keep starting all over again and practiced over and over picking up those lost stitches.  Ok so my perfectionism started unfortunately early in life.  Through the years I just kept teaching myself and learning needlepoint, cross-stitch etc.,etc.,etc. Two years ago I bought my first Embroidery Machine (Viking SE and still love the machine) but one day would like the even larger hoops and something that cut those painful jump threads! 
    Through the years, I was blessed to have 5 children: Julie, Jennifer, Jason, Jenee (Sounds like Renee with a J) and Jonathan.  Jonathan just graduated in May and so I am having to re-learn how to take care of myself :)
I am a nurse and oversee four great areas of the hospital: Prenatal/Postnatal Education, Case Management, Lactation Services, and Doula Services.  I also teach Bachelor's and Master's Nursing students.  Each of you have been my support, encouragement and inspiration over the last few years.  Thank you for each of your gifts!  You have and continue to help me on more levels than you will ever know!  Well enough about me! Tell us about you!

(in reply to Sparkle)
Post #: 62
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/17/2011 10:53:19 AM   
Linda S.

 

Posts: 5801
Joined: 2/2/2011
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Shebru and Mizilly, Yes, this was called french terry (no doubt velour's evil twin) and because of this stuff it's a wonder I ever sat behind a sewing machine again! The only thing that saved me was the fact I had made a few purses that turned out great. Another fabric with similar qualities is thermal knit, or at least the one I bought was too stretchy even for my new serger (WITH differential feed).

"Boa constrictor"? LOL! This fabric definitely has a mind of it's own. I was entertaining the thought of buying silk batiste, and if I do will certainly remember your words of caution. It's nice to know things like this, so we don't think it's the 'terry curse' coming back to haunt us : )

(in reply to mizlilly)
Post #: 63
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/17/2011 11:01:45 AM   
Linda S.

 

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Joined: 2/2/2011
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KCline, I think if I saw someone knitting socks, I'd start to believe anything was possible! Recently, I noticed patterns for knitted socks in an antique pattern book (ebay I think), and was in total awe of anyone who could do that. The socks picured looked very finely textured. I believe there were some referred to as "stockings" (?) which looked alot like precursers to our modern day hoisery.

These memories of the work our grandmothers and mothers did are wonderful treasures, to remember and admire from time to time. These were the original "get 'er done" and "where there's a will, there's a way" women. My hat is certainly off! What wonderful inspiration.

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 64
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/17/2011 3:14:30 PM   
cnagle957

 

Posts: 143
Joined: 2/3/2011
Status: offline
Thought I'd jump in here at the end.  I did not have a Mom or grandmother who did beautiful sewing, they mended.

I flunked Home Ec sewing in school.

I started quilting in 1995 and got my first TOL machine in 2000.  At the time, I didn't purchase the embroidery module with it because "I'm a quilter".  A year or so later, while making a service appt. for my machine I asked the tech if they ever got embroidery modules in as trade-ins that they would sell.  After asking what machine I had, he had one and would sell it to me for a good price.  I went that weekend and picked it up and the rest is history.  I now combine my loves for quilting and embroidery together!

I tried to get my daughter interested in sewing (not happening) and I don't have a sewing buddy near me so the forums are the only places where I can chat with my "sisters" or get help to solve a problem.  She told me last week that she's not a cook.  (I sent her to college, so I KNOW that she KNOWS how to pay attention).  My son is in the Army, but is currently stationed stateside thank God.  He can cook up a mean bowl of cereal!

The people that I have met through these forums (only 1 so far in person, Sparkle!) are the absolute best!  When my other half was traveling out of country, my Dad passed away and "my friends" on the forums talked to me and comforted me when I was really falling apart.  They may not know how incredibly important their reaching out to me that night was, but I will forever be grateful.  They got me through my darkest hours.

I am a junkie (don't make that face, keep reading), I have 6 sewing machines.  I can't help myself!  I have my Mom's old Singer, my Grandmother's old Singer, my old singer, 2 Singer Featherweights, and my Bernina 170.  I want a "new" machine, but the way those prices are rising I just don't know.

I have 4 grandsons whom I absolutely adore.  And I make them quilts and t-shirts and whatever they ask of me, I'll figure out how to do it.

I really should sell a couple of machines to make room and then I may be better be able to convince myself that I deserve a new one!  (It's not working yet.)

I work full-time (yep, I'm doing it now) and spend a good part of my day wishing that I were home in my sewing room!

That's it and that's all!

Hugs to you all!

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 65
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/17/2011 3:36:16 PM   
newmexicomama

 

Posts: 44
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It's funny, I can't get my daughter to sew.  She lives half way across the US in Jacksonville and wouldn't even hem her dress pants.  So she pays someone to do it.  Guess the sewing line dies out with me.  My son and daughter-in-law don't have an interest in sewing either.
I quilt also.  But I started with machine embroidery then went to quilting.  I love to combine the two.  I haven't sewed an outfit in years.  I have the material just no desire to make anything. 
This forum is the first place I check when I get online.  I love to read all the happenings with the sewing ladies.
I have the 180 and recently bought the new 830.  There is a world of difference between the two.  I love the way it sews.  The straight stitch is great and the huge designs are fantastic.  Sound like a dealer but I'm not.  There's lots between the two that are very nice also.  But for quilting you can get a kingsize quilt in the harp and have plenty of room.
Lanny

(in reply to cnagle957)
Post #: 66
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/18/2011 5:00:29 PM   
Linda S.

 

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Joined: 2/2/2011
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I can totally relate to all who can't seem to part with their older machines. I have my mother's kenmore and feel this machine deserves some loyalty and care in it's old age for all the work it's done. Mom's machine doesn't do a zig-zag, and I discovered the most beautiful straight stitch I've ever seen on this old kenmore. When my husband bought me a "new fangled zig-zagger" (boy I thought I was uptown then!) I noticed the straight stitch wasn't quite as pretty. Years later, my dealer told me that any machine that zig-zags will never ever go in a perfectly straight line...there will always be a very slight amount of going from side to side. I don't know if this is still true for all the newer machines, but it is for the ones I have. Mom's old kenmore still makes the straightest, prettiest top-stitching.

I also have an old Singer treddle machine which belonged to my husband's grandmother. We rescued it from her basement and because it is so beautifully decorated (black with golden swirls and designs) for years we looked at it as ornamental. Then one day I mentioned this to the sewing machine dealer, who told me he could still order a belt for it! So, I got a new belt (leather...just like the old one) and I'll be dog gonned if that machine doesn't sew like a dream.

When my daughter was old enough to crawl around, she got her little finger caught and hurt in the wheel (kids can't resist sticking fingers wherever they will fit ; ), and so the belt was removed and the wheel wired stationary. I'm sure it would still sew fine if we put the belt back on...and I feel secure with knowing that if the end of the world comes and we don't have electricity...I can still sew!!!

There is alot of sentimental attachment to these, and I love hearing stories about others cherished old machines. Thanks for sharing : )

(in reply to newmexicomama)
Post #: 67
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/18/2011 9:25:08 PM   
Bonita

 

Posts: 82
Joined: 4/4/2011
From: Southwest WI
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These introductions have been very interesting. I started sewing when I was probably 12 years old and got my first sewing machine in 1973 a Sears Kenmore. It was a great machine but traded it in for a Pfaff 1171 which I still have. Also have a Pfaff 7570 and Ellagante 2 Babylock. I also have the Evolution Serger by Babylock.

I first met Martha Pullen several years ago when she attended Nancy's Sewing Weekend in Beaver Dam WI. I attended her seminars and became hooked on heirloom sewing. More recent years 2 of Martha's staff presented a day long seminar of hands on at the Sewing/Quilt Expo held at Fennimore WI, which I also attended.

My goal is to be able to attend the School of Art Fashion some year, but right now I am not able as I care for my elderly Mother and work part time. So, in the meantime I order the DVD's from Martha and learn heirloom sewing/sergering that way.

Besides sewing, I enjoy hand embroidery, counted cross stitch, knitting and reading.

Bonita from Southwest WI

(in reply to Linda S.)
Post #: 68
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/18/2011 10:17:56 PM   
KCline

 

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Linda, the socks were intricate with some lacy and frilly and the men's sock were actually argyles with all different colors of yarn streaming from them until they were completed.  Every Christmas everyone got socks!!!

(in reply to Bonita)
Post #: 69
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/19/2011 12:30:56 PM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
Status: offline
Thank you all for keeping this going. I am enjoying the stories of how we learned and why we sew and what we so. I is truely fun. Thanks!

_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to KCline)
Post #: 70
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/19/2011 1:10:15 PM   
ShirleyCalgary


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From: Calgary Area of Alberta
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Linda - really years ago the nuns taught children of 10 years old how to knit mitts and 12 years old how to knit socks - I was disappointed that the year before the girls one year ahead of me did argyle socks but our class the following year did cable socks (knee high) I dont know what kind of socks my sister got to knit 2 years later.  For me mitts and socks are what I think of as mindless knitting.  My youngest sister's Godfather was injured during the war - during recovery they taught him how to knit socks - he was a great bear of a man with huge hands yet he told me he knitted socks. My youngest sister Debbie by the time she got to the same school the nuns were no longer wearing habits (those black and white dress for religious) and they had integrated boys into an all girls academy for previous 50 years and because of the boys they no longer did sewing/knitting/cooking/crochet  for the boys they no longer learned what was referred to as shop - I remember the boys of my age who went to the all boys school in our parish making a tool box and a bird house and a clothespin box with lid on hinges - what a pity that this had to happen.  A whole generation of kids missed out and continue to miss out.

_____________________________

Shirley - Mom to Dickens (PuppyWuppy now known as Dicky Wicky)and Doyle (baby) and Baxter, Bella, Pistol, Cowboy, ChiChi at Rainbow Bridge
I sew on Janome 8000, 10001, 11000se, 12000, 350e, 300e, Janome 234d and Babylock Imagine

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 71
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/19/2011 3:50:36 PM   
Grandmom

 

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From: Florida
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I just got kitcked off the internet. Anyway I love hearing about others. Reading about the socks broguht back memeories from sooooo long ago. I made argyle socks for my then boyfriend. I made matching sweaters for the two of us which I know he loved.. I never did know if he wore the socks.
Grandmom

(in reply to ShirleyCalgary)
Post #: 72
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/19/2011 4:58:47 PM   
Suzannm

 

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After reading all these posts, I thought I should join in too. I have been here for a long time and always check in a couple of times a day. So here goes...

I have always had an interest in sewing. My mum got me interested in fabric and yarn. When I was a child, she spent her days in her own sweat shop at home, (doing piece work, there is no joke in the sweat shop remark) sewing cushion covers on an industrial machine. She can put a zip in with amazing speed. But even though she spent the days sewing for a pittance, it didn't seem to kill her desire to create clothing for her two girls and herself. My sister and I lived through the period in the 60's always dressed in matching outfits! She also created knitted garments for everybody using an Empisal knitting machine.....and that is how I got started with the whole machine embroidery/quilting thing. I bought an Empisal knitting machine and my mum taught me to knit. I was off and running, I bought balls of wool, skeins of wool, cones of wool. I knitted like a mad woman. I upgraded my machine, I kept the old one, I bought a machine that could knit bulky yarns like 12 ply mohair, I kept the old machine. You can see where this is going can't you. My last purchase in the knitting machine department was a Brother 970. All computer based technology. I had to learn how to use the computer. I am still tripping over three machines as we speak. So how does this relate to embroidery you ask? Well the man I bought the last knitting machine from was also a sewing machine dealer. He had Jenny Haskins in for one of her famous "Trunk Shows" and asked me if I was interested. I went and then it got expensive! Jenny's work was awe inspiring and I had seen nothing like it. I was in love with stitch no 83. I wanted to know more. So the very next Stitches and Craft show I bought a Pfaff 7570 (with stitch no 83). I did a couple of quilts on my own, and then signed up for a class doing "U is for Unicorn" by Eileen Campbell (a quilt based on a medieval alphabet). I used over 5000 metres of gold thread. Next years class was "Under the Sea" another quilt based on an Eileen Campbell quilt. Halfway through this quilt, my thread guides on my baby were worn out. What is a girl to do - it was going to take Pfaff 6 weeks to get the part in - I would be too far behind. So I bought another machine. A very basic machine so I could get on with all my free motion work and still keep up with things. ( I learned a lot about free motion on this quilt). My baby duly returned, I continued on embroidering fish and shells and finished in the same year. I have since purchased a Pfaff 2124 (it had a bigger frame but sounds like a tractor) and then a couple of years ago, I managed to get my hands on a PR 600. Through all of this, my darling husband has encouraged and moaned (mostly about the amount of stuff I possess) and just doesn't even raise an eyebrow when the credit card shows, Spotlight, Spotlight, Patchwork Shop, Spotlight........ usually just a comment like - so you have been busy this month..... I even got an extension to my sewing room a couple of years ago. It was Al's hope that all fabric, thread and yarn would be contained but there is still frequently spill over it to other rooms. I think I am going to have to cull a little soon, I had planned on living to 300 to get through all of this but I don't think that is going to happen, so will have to spread the joy that is machine embroidery and machine knitting and get some space back.

Sue

_____________________________

http://tiramisue-suesblog.blogspot.com/

(in reply to embroideryallsorts)
Post #: 73
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/25/2011 4:35:58 PM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
Status: offline
ttt to the top
Who is next?

< Message edited by jem -- 10/25/2011 4:36:55 PM >


_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to Suzannm)
Post #: 74
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/25/2011 4:53:25 PM   
Scottish Anna


Posts: 1122
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From: Leicester, England
Status: offline
Jem,

I left a message for Stacie about keeping this at the top, but to date, still no reply.

Anna


_____________________________

I would be unstoppable, if I could just get started!

I want to do, not think, that is my problem!

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 75
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/25/2011 6:04:55 PM   
jem


Posts: 3464
Joined: 2/1/2011
From: Atlanta Ga area
Status: offline
I think that would be an excellent idea, Anna. I've noticed we don't get answers rapidly but then we haven't found huge suprises either. That could be good.

_____________________________

Psalms 121
The Needler, =^..^=
Jacki, IJCCS (International Jammie Club of Creative Stitchers)
librocubicularist

(in reply to Scottish Anna)
Post #: 76
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/25/2011 8:33:00 PM   
SewLynn


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From: Central NY
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Started with hand embroidery when I was 8.  Believe it or not, my dad taught me - he & his dad & 2 brothers, grew up with 5 sisters, a couple of aunts, his grandmother and mom all in the same house! From there, I progressed to making doll clothes, then simple stuff like the classic home ec apron and wrap skirt.  By the time I was 14, I was stretching my allowance and babysitting dollars by sewing some of my own clothing - mostly simple skirts, then came dresses around age 16 with my PT dollars, and by the time I was out working FT at 17, I was making 75% of my own wardrobe.  Well then ... I met my ex-husband at an early age and over the next 25 years I sewed a lot.  The man didn't appreciate much about me, but he did see the value in keeping me sewing.  I made many many outfits for our children when they were young, and it paid well to sew for others which enabled me to be a stay-at-home mom by making items for others - dresses, costumes, dance apparel, even wedding apparel; eventually I became known for specialty formal wear alterations and original creations.  Post-divorce I needed a FT "real" job with benefits, and I may have slowed down quite a bit but I have never stopped sewing.  More recently, I have held a FT "real" job and a PT position at a machine dealer which evolved into freelance classes for machine embroiders.  While I'm not financially prepared to retire just yet, I do look forward to the day when I have more time to sew again.



_____________________________

Member since 2001.

(in reply to jem)
Post #: 77
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/26/2011 11:47:34 PM   
LaurieB

 

Posts: 94
Joined: 4/1/2011
From: Illinois
Status: offline
I have enjoyed reading all of the introductions, and feel a bit like a long-time lurker coming out! I have been hooked on heirloom sewing and smocking since our older daughter was born in 1981. Over the years, I have participated a little in the World Wide Wades list and Nana Pennypockets list. For the past seven years, I have been consumed with a demanding teaching position that I finally had the courage to leave at the end of the last school year. I started sewing one summer when I was 11 years old. My best friend"s Grandmother decided we would stay out of everybody's hair if she gave us her old White sewing machine to make clothes for our Barbie dolls. We had more fun that summer perusing the pattern catalogs at McCrory's 5 and Dime, buying a pattern to make our creations from the scrap bag. We suffered through Home Ec in 8th grade making A-line jumpers (yikes) but in the 9th grade, our teacher was much more encouraging so we learned to make culottes with zippers. I was fascinated by the Vogue Patterns catalog and by 10th grade I was driving my mother crazy making mini skirts and dresses for the school dances (always at the last minute.) Fast forward to college--no other choice other than to major in Textiles and Apparel--then onto teaching Home Ec. We moved to Western Ohio in 1978, and I was lucky enough to meet the local Bernina dealer--and discovered the world of heirloom sewing. I was fascinated by English Smocking, but nobody in our area knew anything about it. I remember driving all the way to Toledo to take a workshop from Dianne Durand, and coming home with a pleater that I was afraid to use! I did learn how to use it, and then went on to do custom pleating and taught smocking and construction. By the time my daughters were about twelve, I got busy with other things and moved away from heirloom sewing but discovered machine embroidery when the Janome 8000 came out. This has turned into an expensive pursuit, because every time the technology improved, I "needed" to get the latest and greatest. I have loved learning all about the computer along with the embroidery. For the past three years, I have been consumed between taking care of my elderly parents and dealing with the stress of a teaching position with too many administrative duties. I knew it was time to shift gears. For years--at least from the first issues--I have read and treasured every issue of Sew Beautiful. I had always wanted to go to a MP event in Huntsville, and when the Sewing for Babies licensing class coincided with my Spring Break--my husband said to "go for it" and think about making a career change. Meeting Martha has changed my life! I resigned at the end of the school year, and have been working for my local Janome/Brother dealer. I am starting up a series of the Sewing for Babies classes at the store, and I am working on my business plan to start doing custom embroidery. I have made some wonderful encouraging MP friends, and was so inspired to sew with them again at SOAF in July. I fell in love with the Brother Quattro this summer, and I just brought home my very own machine last week. It is SO easy to use!! I have been embroidering up a storm for our six month old grandson. I did the cutest romper for him over the weekend in an applique design that says "My First Halloween" I am also working on the flower girl dresses for my older daughter's wedding in February. They are Ivory silk dupionni Vintage Natalie with marine blue sashes in the wedding colors. In the meantime, I have been reading the Forum and working up enough courage to actually post--and then to move into my own blog. I am fascinated by the online sewing community, and I want to be an active part of it. I sew on a Bernina 730e, a Janome 1200D serger, still use my trusty Bernina 1530 for piecing quilts, in addition to playing on the Brother 6700D. I would like to make and sell custom baby items and covered button pacifier covers.

It's so inspiring to be back on this Forum. I used to read it before the re-organization. There are a lot of quilters in my area, but not very many people are into heirloom sewing and smocking. It's so nice to know that there are so many other heirloom sewers out there!!

Laurie--wife, mother of 3 (33, 30, and 26) and grandmother to one sweet little boy (6 months), and a pack rat with toooo much fabric!!

(in reply to SewLynn)
Post #: 78
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/27/2011 3:45:47 PM   
Scottish Anna


Posts: 1122
Joined: 2/2/2011
From: Leicester, England
Status: offline
ttt

I am awaiting a reply from Stacie to see about keeping this topic at the top, anyone else want to try?

Hugs

Anna


_____________________________

I would be unstoppable, if I could just get started!

I want to do, not think, that is my problem!

(in reply to LaurieB)
Post #: 79
RE: OT - kinda - Introduce Yourself - 10/28/2011 11:15:41 AM   
Daylily430


Posts: 432
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From: Boston, MA
Status: offline
I have enjoyed reading this thread and “meeting” so many contributors to this forum! In that spirit, I am emerging from “behind the scenes”.

Growing up, my mother made many of my clothes and thus my interest in sewing and making doll clothes began. One Christmas “Santa” brought me Singer chain stitch sewing machine (which are now collectors’ items- don’t know what became of mine…) I was thrilled! When I was in 5th and 6th grade, girls took “sewing” and made a skirt and a top, and the following year an apron to wear when we took “cooking” at the Jr. High. I entered private school in seventh grade, so never had Home Ec, but continued to sew with my Mom’s help.

In college, majoring in Home Economics, I needed a sewing machine that could do more than just a straight stitch, so my Mom and I invested $350 in a TOL Viking 6030 machine which I still have, although it is not working. (A sewing machine tech recommended that I use it as a boat anchor!) I put many miles on that machine until I “happened” to get a good discount on a Pfaff 1475CD machine while teaching sewing at a local fabric store. Then, as we know, one thing leads to another…

My Dh liked “toys” and computers as much as I do, so for a gift one time, I bought Prodigy which was an early internet service program. He never used it, but I did, and found a message board all about Pfaff and people were sharing the designs that they were plotting on the design creator that went with my machine. So, of course I had to try that! It was tedious, the results were cute, but somehow something was missing… I am a long-time subscriber to many sewing magazines and Machine Embroidery was creeping into these magazines with increasing frequency and even spawning magazines devoted to ME exclusively!!! I had learned free-motion machine embroidery years ago, but this involved the computer too! I did a “walk-by” at the Pfaff machine dealership to see the 2170 in action came home and mentioned it to Dh. His next words were “why don’t you get it.” So, on Oct. 30, 2005 I made the purchase, and on or about that time I began reading this Forum!

Like others have said, I have learned so much from so many talented and giving members that post to these boards. Teaching full-time has cut into my “sewing/embroidery” time so I never felt that I had anything “new” to add here. I was doing a lot of “catching-up” or “try-this-for-fun”.

For me, there have been some changes over the last few years. I taught Home Ec in a very large school system in a department that was seen as one of the best programs/models in our state. It was so much fun to go to school each day! The kids were great, my colleagues were the best. Life was good! But with changing curriculum demands and State-Mandated testing, the school department eliminated several programs and cut others. I was transferred to a different school and grade level, and saw the handwriting on the wall, that Home Ec would probably phased-out. The State changed teacher certification classifications and I could seek an additional area of licensure in Health Education. I was 6 years away from retirement with full benefits and although I had seniority over others in my department, if the entire department were cut I would be at a major loss. I convinced another colleague to “go for the Health Certification” and we both got saved when 2 years later they cut the program, entirely.

Just before Christmas in 2006, my husband was diagnosed with stage 3A lung cancer. He had not smoked in more than 30 years, but did have a history of bronchitis & asthma. The Dr. sent him for a cat scan-just routine- before Thanksgiving and something showed up. This was not seen in x-rays taken the previous Feb. We fought that battle for 20 months. I lost him in July of 2008.

I retired from teaching in June 2010 and am loving every minute!! My car has spent most of this week at the “spa” so have been driving Dd to the train & picking her up, so I have her car to use. If I were working I’d have to use a rental to get to school…

I enjoy all types of sewing. These days I don’t need working wardrobe but Dd does!!!

Recently I have purchased a Babylock Enlighten to replace my Elna5 serger, and a Babylock coverstitch machine. I did mention that I like “toys”!

Thank you for starting this thread; it’s what encouraged me to write today. I hope others will accept this invitation and we can keep this ttt!











(in reply to Scottish Anna)
Post #: 80
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